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>>News>Newsdetail

Erinnerung: Das hat sich bei den NSBA Regeln 2006 geändert


Imagimotion & Hubertus Jagfeld | Quelle:

Imagimotion & Hubertus Jagfeld
Bild:



2006 NSBA RULE CHANGES

The following rules have either been adopted or changed by the NSBA Board of Directors to be effective January 1, 2006. Underlined items indicate new rules. (XXXX) indicates wording being deleted. Rule numbers are reflective of the 2005 Rulebook.



ARTICLE IX
Breed Associations



The Association hereby recognizes the following breed associations for their support in promotions of better pleasure horses:



1. American Paint Horse Association

2. American Quarter Horse Association



3. Appaloosa Horse Club



4. Palomino Horse Breeders of America



5. International Buckskin Horse Association



6. Pinto Horse Association



7. Pony of America Club



8. American Buckskin Registry Association



Additional breed associations may be recognized if they request same and provide proof of their efforts to promote better pleasure horses.




MEMBERSHIP

3. NSBA regular memberships are available by paying ($40.00) $45.00 (U.S.) for the first individual or owner membership and ($20.00) $25.00 (U.S.) for each additional immediate family member at the same address. Youth memberships are available for ($20.00) $25.00 with current 4H/FFA verification card or recognized breed youth card. Only the ($40.00) $45.00 Regular membership includes the magazine.

CLASS FOR APPROVAL

Open Yearling Longe Line Western: may be split into
Open Western Yearling Longe Line

Open Hunter Yearling Longe Line

Non-Pro Yearling Longe Line: may be split into

Non-Pro Western Yearling Longe Line

Non-Pro Hunter Yearling Longe Line

Limited Non-Pro Yearling Longe Line

Two Yr. Old Open WP

Two Yr. Old Intermediate Open WP

Two Yr. Old Limited Open WP

Two Yr. Old $2500 Rider Open WP

Two Yr. Old Non-Pro WP

Two Yr. Old Intermediate Non-Pro WP

Two Yr. Old Limited Non-Pro WP

Two Yr. Old Open HUS

Two Yr. Old Limited Open HUS

Two Yr. Old Non-Pro HUS

Two Yr. Old Limited Non-Pro HUS

Three Yr. Old Open WP

Three Yr. Old Intermediate Open WP

Three Yr. Old Limited Open WP

Three Yr. Old $2500 Rider Open WP

Three Yr. Old WP Novice Horse

Three Yr. Old Non-Pro WP

Three Yr. Old Intermediate Non-Pro WP

Three Yr. Old Limited Non-Pro WP

Three Yr. Old Open HUS

Three Yr. Old Limited Open HUS

Three Yr. Old Non-Pro HUS

Three Yr. Old Limited Non-Pro HUS

Three/Four Yr. Old Open HUS

Three/Four Yr. Old Ltd. Open HUS

Three/Four Yr. Old Non-Pro HUS

Three/Four Yr. Old Ltd. Non-Pro HUS

Maturity Open WP

Maturity Intermediate Open WP

Maturity Limited Open WP

Maturity $2500 Rider Open WP

Maturity WP Limited Horse

Maturity HUS Limited Horse

Maturity Non-Pro WP

Maturity Intermediate Non-Pro WP

Maturity Limited Non-Pro WP

Maturity Open HUS

Maturity Limited Open HUS

Maturity Non-Pro HUS

Maturity Non-Pro Limited HUS

Color Horse (any and all age of horse in any and all divisions)

Walk Trot WP

Walk Trot HUS

Walk Trot Trail

Youth WP

Youth HUS

50 & Over Non-Pro WP

50 & Over Non-Pro HUS

All Aged Novice Non-Pro WP

All Aged WP Events

All Aged HUS events

Green Western Pleasure

Green Hunter Under Saddle

Green Trail

Green Western Riding


DUAL APPROVED CLASSES

Open Yearling Longe Line
Amateur Yearling Longe Line

Two Yr. Old Open WP

Two Yr. Old Open HUS

Amateur WP

Amateur HUS

Amateur Trail

Amateur Western Riding

Amateur Select WP

Amateur Select HUS

Amateur Select Trail

Amateur Select Western Riding

Youth WP (all ages)

Youth 13 & under WP

Youth 14-18 WP

Youth HUS (all ages)

Youth 13 & Under HUS

Youth 14-18 HUS

Youth Trail (all ages)

Youth 13 & under Trail

Youth 14-18 Trail

Youth Western Riding (all ages)

Youth 13 & under Western Riding

Youth 14-18 Western Riding

Jr. WP (5 yrs old and under)

Sr. WP (6 yrs old and over)

or Open Western Pleasure

Jr. HUS (5 yrs and under)

Sr. HUS (6 yrs old and over)

or Open Hunter Under Saddle

Jr. Trail (5 yrs old and under)

Sr. Trail (6 yrs old and over

or Open Trail

Jr. Western Riding (5 yrs old and under)

Sr. Western Riding (6 yrs old and over)

or Open Western Riding


THERAPEUTIC MEDICATIONS

10) Diclofenac (Surpass) - The maximum premitted plasma concentration of Diclafenac is 0.005 micrograms per milliliter. Every 12 hours, not more than 73 mg of diclofenac liposomal cream should be administered (not more than 146 mg per 24 hour period) to one affected site. This 73 mg dose equals a 5-inch ribbon of cream not greater than 1/2 inch in width, which should be rubbed thoroughly into the hair over the joint or affected site using gloved hands. Administration of diclofenac cream should be discontinued 12 hours prior to competing. Do not apply diclofenac cream in combination with any other topical preparations including DMSO, nitrofurazone, or liniments and do not use on an open wound. Diclofenac cream should not be administered for more than 10 successive days.

WORKING EVENTS

Rules #118 - 122 apply to all Western Pleasure, Hunter Under Saddle, Trail, Western Riding, and Longe Line events approved by the NBSA.

WESTERN PLEASURE
GAITS


125. (A) A horse that is walking correctly is bright, alert and responsive to the riders guidance. The walk is a four beat gait. It should be soft, comfortable, flat and ground covering. Each foot should come out of the ground at the same pace it goes in.)
(B) The jog should be soft, relaxed and comfortable, with a clean lift in the motion. The legs should be working in diagonal pairs, making a distinct two beat gait. At no time should it resemble a running walk nor should it be rough or stilted. The speed and stride should be compatible with the horse's' size and conformation.)

(C) The lope is a rolling, natural three beat gait. It should be soft and comfortable. The horses' legs should be moving freely with full extension of the limbs.)

(D) The back: Horses should back, on command, quietly, willingly and easily in a straight line without resistance. Jawing, resisting or tossing of the head should be penalized. It is permissible for horses to be backed on the rail.)

E) IMPORTANT: As long as horses with naturally longer strides are performing the gaits correctly, they should NOT be penalized for passing other horses.

F) Horses must be sound of limb.

A) THE WALK:

1) Poor Walk: Is a horse with an uneven pace and no cadence. He has a robot appearance and hesitates. He has no flow, and he may appear intimidated, or appear to march.

2) Average Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, a level top line, and appears relaxed. This done correctly is average.

3) Good Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, level top line, and a relaxed appearance yet is bright and attentive; he flows and is soft touching the ground.

B) THE JOG

1) Unacceptable Jog: This is a horse that cannot perform a two beat gait and appears very uncomfortable in his attempt to accomplish the gait. He does not have any flow or balance in his motion and appears uncomfortable to ride.

2) Poor Jog: This is a horse that hesitates or skips a beat in his two beat motion. He does not keep an even and balanced motion with a level top line. A horse must have a true two beat gait to be average. This horse appears to shuffle.

3) Slightly Below Average Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of the negative characteristics may be walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes as he jogs or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.

4) Correct or Average Jog: This is a horse with a two beat diagonal gait in which the left front and right hind foot touch the ground simultaneously and the right front and left hind do so also. He has a level top line and a relaxed appearance while being shown with light contact and appears to guide well. This is the standard or average jog.

5) Good Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.

6) Very Good Jog: Is a horse that appears very comfortable to ride, always has a consistent two beat gait, is guiding well, and has a relaxed and level top line. He may let his hocks drift back into his tail from time to time, or bends his knee a little, but is obviously soft on the ground.

7) Excellent Jog: This is a horse whose motions seem effortless and very efficient. He swings his legs, yet touches the ground very softly. The horse is confident, yet still soft in his motion. He is balanced and under control. He is flat with his knee and hock and has some cushion in his pastern. His expression is bright and alert and exhibits more lift and self-carriage than the "very good jog".

C) THE MODERATE EXTENDED JOG:

1) Good Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend has an obvious lengthening in his stride with a slight increase in his pace making him more versatile. This horse is still smooth but appears to have more length with less effort being exerted.

2) Average Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend, moves up in his pace and still appears smooth to sit on.

3) Poor Extended Jog: This horse never appears to lengthen his stride but just jogs faster. He may also appear to be jarring and rough to ride.

D) THE LOPE:

1) Unacceptable Lope: This is a horse that does not have a true three beat gait. He has no flow, no rhythm or balance, appears out of sync, and is obviously not comfortable to ride.

2) Poor Lope: Is a horse that may appear to have a three beat gait but has no lift or self-carriage. This horse shuffles, has no flow, and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. He also does not appear comfortable to ride.

3) Slightly Below Average Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of these negative characteristics may be head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse's buttocks. An over-canted horse generally displays these negative characteristics.

4) Correct or Average Lope: This is a horse that has a true three beat gait, with a level top line and very little head and neck motion. The horse has a comfortable motion and is relatively straight (not over-canted). He glides well, and has a relaxed appearance. This is the standard or average lope.

5) Good Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage, a steady top-line, responsiveness to the rider's aids and a relaxed appearance.

6) Very Good Lope: This is a horse that appears to have more lift and flow than the average horse. He also has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee a little, or allow his off lead hind leg or drive leg to fall behind into his tail, yet he still has a level top-line, exhibits self-carriage with a relaxed appearance and appears comfortable to ride.

7) Excellent Lope: This horse rounds his back and has a strong deep stride and a flat swing with his front legs. He swings his legs correct and long yet seems to do it effortlessly. He keeps a very level top-line; his hocks don't drift behind into his tail. This horse has a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance. This is a very special horse that is correct, yet soft. This horse has a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

E) THE TOP-LINE:

1) Poor Top-Line: The horse's head may be to high or to low. If the horse's head is consistently higher than his eye level with his withers, his back becomes hollow and he loses his drive from behind. When his head is consistently lower than his ear level with his wither, he becomes heavy on his forehand and has no lift or flow. In both cases the horse loses his self-carriage and appears to struggle.

2) Average Top-Line: A horse who generally display's a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point but is inconsistent with his head carriage.

3) Good Top-Line: This horse will display a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point. He also displays a consistent top-line that exhibits self-carriage.

F) THE BACK UP:

1) Poor Back Up: This horse appears resistant or heavy in front. He may gap his mouth, throw his head or back crooked.

2) Average or Correct Back Up: This horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

3) Good Back Up: This horse will display balanced and smooth flowing movements, self-carriage, and look to be a pleasure to ride. The horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly and without gapping his mouth. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

G) IMPORTANT: As long as horses with naturally longer strides are performing the gaits correctly, they should NOT be penalized for passing other horses.

H) Horses must be sound of limb.


HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
EQUIPMENT


Rule 135. B) - (All English bits approved for use by AQHA are approved for use in any Three-year-old or older NSBA Hunter Under Saddle events. All English snaffle bits approved for use by AQHA are approved for use in NSBA Two-year-old Hunter Under Saddle classes Except for Kimberwicks.)
1) In all NSBA Three-year-old or older Hunter Under Saddle classes an English snaffle (no shank), Kimberwick, Pelham, Mylars and/or full bridle (with two reins): all with cavesson nosebands and plain leather brow bands must be used.

2) In reference to mouthpieces, nothing may protrude below the mouthpiece (bar). Solid and broken mouthpieces may have a port no higher than 1 ½". On broken mouthpieces only, connecting rings of 1 ¼" or less in diameter or connecting flat bar of 3/8" to ¾" (measured top to bottom with a maximum length of 2") and which lie flat in the horse's mouth are acceptable. All mouthpieces must be a minimum of 5/16" in diameter to be measured 1" in from the cheek or ring. Snaffle bit ring may be no larger than 4" in diameter. Any bit having a fixed rein requires use of a curb chain. Smooth round, oval or egg-shaped, slow twist, corkscrew, single twisted wire, double twisted wire mouthpieces and straight bar or solid mouthpieces with a maximum of 1 ½" high ports are allowed.

3) Bits of any style (Pelham,snaffle, kimberwick) featuring mouthpieces with cathedrals, donuts, prongs, edges, or rough, sharp material shall be cause for elimination. If a curb bit is used, the chain must be at least ½" in width and flat against the jaw of the horse.

4) In all NSBA Two-year-old Hunter Under Saddle classes an English snaffle bit may be used. They must be oval, round, egg-shaped, smooth, inlayed. No mouth pieces can be wrapped in metal. No square stock steel can be used. Slow twists, corkscrew, double and single twisted wires may be used if they are 5/16" in diameter to be measured 1" in from the cheek or ring. Bits may be broken in more than one place. No bit with leverage such as Kimberwicks, pelhams, Mylars, or any bit with shanks, a curb chain, or reins attached to the bit may be used.

Rule 135. D) Optional Equipment

1. English spurs of the unrowelled type that are blunt, round, and no longer than 1”.

2. Crops or Bats

3. Braiding of mane and/or tail in Hunt Style

4. (Number holders on saddle pads.) Saddle pads should fit size and shape to accommodate numbers on both sides. Saddle pads and attachments shall be white or natural. Saddles should be black or brown.


HUNTER UNDER SADDLE EVENTS

143. MATURITY LIMITED HORSE HUNTER UNDER SADDLE

ELIGIBILITY

a) Stallions, mares and geldings four years old or older and are registered with a NSBA recognized breed association or The Jockey Club.
b) Horse must not have won more than $2,500 in NSBA HUS events.

c) Horses must be ridden with equipment that is approved as per NSBA equipment rules for Hunter Under Saddle horses.


GREEN HORSE DIVISION

144. PURPOSE
The purpose of the green horse division is to allow a horse to compete on an entry-level field with horses of the same level of experience. The green division is a stepping-stone to the more advanced level of competition with seasoned horses. This class should be judged according to the purpose of its intent.

The green horse division will apply to western pleasure, hunter under saddle, western riding, and trail.

145. CLASS LISTING

1. Green Western Pleasure

a. Equipment - Per Rule #123(c): Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

2. Green Hunter Under Saddle

a. Equipment - Per Rule #135(b):

3. Green Trail

a. Per Rule #123(c): Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

4. Green Western Riding

a. Per Rule #123(c): Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

146. ELIGIBILITY

a. Any two year old or older stallions, mares and geldings registered with a NSBA recognized breed association.

b. Per Rule #36: Two-Year-Olds may not be shown prior to July 1st.

c. Any horse that has not earned more than 10 points per event in any NSBA recognized breed association, or more than $1000.00 in NSBA earnings per event as of January 1 of the current show year. Points from all divisions, cumulative - youth, amateur, open - will count. Novice points will not count. Eligibility of the horse is on the honor system and can be subject to verification through NSBA and/or recognized breed associations.


GREEN TRAIL
EQUIPMENT


147. Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

ATTIRE

148. Conventional western attire is mandatory. Conventional attire includes long sleeve shirt with collar (band, stand-up, tuxedo, etc.) western hat and cowboy boots. The hat must be on the riders head when exhibitor enters the show arena. Spurs and chaps are optional.

GAITS

149. The following terminology shall apply whenever a specific gait is called for:
A) THE WALK:

1) Poor Walk: Is a horse with an uneven pace and no cadence. He has a robot appearance and hesitates. He has no flow, and he may appear intimidated, or appear to march.

2) Average Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, a level top line, and appears relaxed. This done correctly is average.

3) Good Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, level top line, and a relaxed appearance yet is bright and attentive; he flows and is soft touching the ground.

B) THE JOG

1) Unacceptable Jog: This is a horse that cannot perform a two beat gait and appears very uncomfortable in his attempt to accomplish the gait. He does not have any flow or balance in his motion and appears uncomfortable to ride.

2) Poor Jog: This is a horse that hesitates or skips a beat in his two beat motion. He does not keep an even and balanced motion with a level top line. A horse must have a true two beat gait to be average. This horse appears to shuffle.

3) Slightly Below Average Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of the negative characteristics may be walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes as he jogs or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.

4) Correct or Average Jog: This is a horse with a two beat diagonal gait in which the left front and right hind foot touch the ground simultaneously and the right front and left hind do so also. He has a level top line and a relaxed appearance while being shown with light contact and appears to guide well. This is the standard or average jog.

5) Good Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.

6) Very Good Jog: Is a horse that appears very comfortable to ride, always has a consistent two beat gait, is guiding well, and has a relaxed and level top line. He may let his hocks drift back into his tail from time to time, or bends his knee a little, but is obviously soft on the ground.

7) Excellent Jog: This is a horse whose motions seem effortless and very efficient. He swings his legs, yet touches the ground very softly. The horse is confident, yet still soft in his motion. He is balanced and under control. He is flat with his knee and hock and has some cushion in his pastern. His expression is bright and alert and exhibits more lift and self-carriage than the "very good jog".

C) THE MODERATE EXTENDED JOG:

1) Good Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend has an obvious lengthening in his stride with a slight increase in his pace making him more versatile. This horse is still smooth but appears to have more length with less effort being exerted.

2) Average Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend, moves up in his pace and still appears smooth to sit on.

3) Poor Extended Jog: This horse never appears to lengthen his stride but just jogs faster. He may also appear to be jarring and rough to ride.

D) THE LOPE:

1) Unacceptable Lope: This is a horse that does not have a true three beat gait. He has no flow, no rhythm or balance, appears out of sync, and is obviously not comfortable to ride.

2) Poor Lope: Is a horse that may appear to have a three beat gait but has no lift or self-carriage. This horse shuffles, has no flow, and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. He also does not appear comfortable to ride.

3) Slightly Below Average Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of these negative characteristics may be head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse's buttocks. An over-canted horse generally displays these negative characteristics.

4) Correct or Average Lope: This is a horse that has a true three beat gait, with a level top line and very little head and neck motion. The horse has a comfortable motion and is relatively straight (not over-canted). He glides well, and has a relaxed appearance. This is the standard or average lope.

5) Good Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage, a steady top-line, responsiveness to the rider's aids and a relaxed appearance.

6) Very Good Lope: This is a horse that appears to have more lift and flow than the average horse. He also has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee a little, or allow his off lead hind leg or drive leg to fall behind into his tail, yet he still has a level top-line, exhibits self-carriage with a relaxed appearance and appears comfortable to ride.

7) Excellent Lope: This horse rounds his back and has a strong deep stride and a flat swing with his front legs. He swings his legs correct and long yet seems to do it effortlessly. He keeps a very level top-line; his hocks don't drift behind into his tail. This horse has a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance. This is a very special horse that is correct, yet soft. This horse has a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

E) THE TOP-LINE:

1) Poor Top-Line: The horse's head may be to high or to low. If the horse's head is consistently higher than his eye level with his withers, his back becomes hollow and he loses his drive from behind. When his head is consistently lower than his ear level with his wither, he becomes heavy on his forehand and has no lift or flow. In both cases the horse loses his self-carriage and appears to struggle.

2) Average Top-Line: A horse who generally display's a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point but is inconsistent with his head carriage.

3) Good Top-Line: This horse will display a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point. He also displays a consistent top-line that exhibits self-carriage.

F) THE BACK UP:

1) Poor Back Up: This horse appears resistant or heavy in front. He may gap his mouth, throw his head or back crooked.

2) Average or Correct Back Up: This horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

3) Good Back Up: This horse will display balanced and smooth flowing movements, self-carriage, and look to be a pleasure to ride. The horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly and without gapping his mouth. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

G) Horses must be sound of limb.


JUDGING

See also: Judges (#104 - 117), A General (#118) and Rules (#121 D & E)
150. Green trail will be judged on the performance of the horse over obstacles with emphasis on movement, smoothness in gaits and transitions and willingness to execute the maneuvers with a willing attitude.

Horses shall be penalized for artificial appearance over the obstacles.


CLASS FORMAT

151. Horses must not be required to work on the rail. However, the course must be designed to show the three gaits (walk, jog, lope) somewhere between the obstacles as part of its work and cadence and quality of movement should be considered as part of the maneuver score. The description of the correct gaits can be found on page 58 of the official NSBA handbook.
The course should be designed for the entry-level horse. Ample space should be used to execute the obstacles.

The following are the guidelines that are recemmended for the green class:

a. Walk overs set at 24" or intervals thereof

b. Trot overs set at 3' or intervals thereof

c. Lope overs set at 6' or intervals thereof

d. Back through set at 36" minimum

e. Serpentine at jog set (straight line) at 12' minimum

d. No elevated obstacles


GREEN WESTERN RIDING

152. The purpose is to create an entry level division in the western riding discipline that places emphasis on movement and quality of lead change while allowing for leniency in assistance from the exhibitor, while still rewarding softness and willingness. The green division will recognize that the horses may not be completely finished and in the bridle.
Credit will be given and emphasis will be placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits and the horses ability to change leads precisely, easily and simultaneously, both front and hind. Cadence and quality of movement should also be a factor in determining the maneuver scores. The quality of movement and quality of lead change will be the emphasis, while the precision of pattern execution will be somewhat secondary within reason.


EQUIPMENT

153. Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

ATTIRE

154. Conventional western attire is mandatory. Conventional attire includes long sleeve shirt with collar (band, stand-up, tuxedo, etc.) western hat and cowboy boots. The hat must be on the riders head when exhibitor enters the show arena. Spurs and chaps are optional.

GAITS

155. The following terminology shall apply whenever a specific gait is called for:
A) THE WALK:

1) Poor Walk: Is a horse with an uneven pace and no cadence. He has a robot appearance and hesitates. He has no flow, and he may appear intimidated, or appear to march.

2) Average Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, a level top line, and appears relaxed. This done correctly is average.

3) Good Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, level top line, and a relaxed appearance yet is bright and attentive; he flows and is soft touching the ground.

B) THE JOG

1) Unacceptable Jog: This is a horse that cannot perform a two beat gait and appears very uncomfortable in his attempt to accomplish the gait. He does not have any flow or balance in his motion and appears uncomfortable to ride.

2) Poor Jog: This is a horse that hesitates or skips a beat in his two beat motion. He does not keep an even and balanced motion with a level top line. A horse must have a true two beat gait to be average. This horse appears to shuffle.

3) Slightly Below Average Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of the negative characteristics may be walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes as he jogs or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.

4) Correct or Average Jog: This is a horse with a two beat diagonal gait in which the left front and right hind foot touch the ground simultaneously and the right front and left hind do so also. He has a level top line and a relaxed appearance while being shown with light contact and appears to guide well. This is the standard or average jog.

5) Good Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.

6) Very Good Jog: Is a horse that appears very comfortable to ride, always has a consistent two beat gait, is guiding well, and has a relaxed and level top line. He may let his hocks drift back into his tail from time to time, or bends his knee a little, but is obviously soft on the ground.

C) THE MODERATE EXTENDED JOG:

1) Good Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend has an obvious lengthening in his stride with a slight increase in his pace making him more versatile. This horse is still smooth but appears to have more length with less effort being exerted.

2) Average Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend, moves up in his pace and still appears smooth to sit on.

3) Poor Extended Jog: This horse never appears to lengthen his stride but just jogs faster. He may also appear to be jarring and rough to ride.

D) THE LOPE:

1) Unacceptable Lope: This is a horse that does not have a true three beat gait. He has no flow, no rhythm or balance, appears out of sync, and is obviously not comfortable to ride.

2) Poor Lope: Is a horse that may appear to have a three beat gait but has no lift or self-carriage. This horse shuffles, has no flow, and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. He also does not appear comfortable to ride.

3) Slightly Below Average Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of these negative characteristics may be head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse's buttocks. An over-canted horse generally displays these negative characteristics.

4) Correct or Average Lope: This is a horse that has a true three beat gait, with a level top line and very little head and neck motion. The horse has a comfortable motion and is relatively straight (not over-canted). He glides well, and has a relaxed appearance. This is the standard or average lope.

5) Good Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage, a steady top-line, responsiveness to the rider's aids and a relaxed appearance.

6) Very Good Lope: This is a horse that appears to have more lift and flow than the average horse. He also has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee a little, or allow his off lead hind leg or drive leg to fall behind into his tail, yet he still has a level top-line, exhibits self-carriage with a relaxed appearance and appears comfortable to ride.

7) Excellent Lope: This horse rounds his back and has a strong deep stride and a flat swing with his front legs. He swings his legs correct and long yet seems to do it effortlessly. He keeps a very level top-line; his hocks don't drift behind into his tail. This horse has a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance. This is a very special horse that is correct, yet soft. This horse has a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

E) THE TOP-LINE:

1) Poor Top-Line: The horse's head may be to high or to low. If the horse's head is consistently higher than his eye level with his withers, his back becomes hollow and he loses his drive from behind. When his head is consistently lower than his ear level with his wither, he becomes heavy on his forehand and has no lift or flow. In both cases the horse loses his self-carriage and appears to struggle.

2) Average Top-Line: A horse who generally display's a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point but is inconsistent with his head carriage.

3) Good Top-Line: This horse will display a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point. He also displays a consistent top-line that exhibits self-carriage.

F) THE BACK UP:

1) Poor Back Up: This horse appears resistant or heavy in front. He may gap his mouth, throw his head or back crooked.

2) Average or Correct Back Up: This horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

3) Good Back Up: This horse will display balanced and smooth flowing movements, self-carriage, and look to be a pleasure to ride. The horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly and without gapping his mouth. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

G) Horses must be sound of limb.

Patterns: The judge will select the pattern to be used and will be responsible for the pattern being set correctly. The pattern will be selected from either the four regular patterns or the three green patterns.


TRAIL
EQUIPMENT


156. Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

ATTIRE

157. Conventional western attire is mandatory. Conventional attire includes long sleeve shirt with collar (band, stand-up, tuxedo, etc.) western hat and cowboy boots. The hat must be on the riders head when exhibitor enters the show arena. Spurs and chaps are optional.

GAITS

158. The following terminology shall apply whenever a specific gait is called for:
A) THE WALK:

1) Poor Walk: Is a horse with an uneven pace and no cadence. He has a robot appearance and hesitates. He has no flow, and he may appear intimidated, or appear to march.

2) Average Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, a level top line, and appears relaxed. This done correctly is average.

3) Good Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, level top line, and a relaxed appearance yet is bright and attentive; he flows and is soft touching the ground.

B) THE JOG

1) Unacceptable Jog: This is a horse that cannot perform a two beat gait and appears very uncomfortable in his attempt to accomplish the gait. He does not have any flow or balance in his motion and appears uncomfortable to ride.

2) Poor Jog: This is a horse that hesitates or skips a beat in his two beat motion. He does not keep an even and balanced motion with a level top line. A horse must have a true two beat gait to be average. This horse appears to shuffle.

3) Slightly Below Average Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of the negative characteristics may be walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes as he jogs or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.

4) Correct or Average Jog: This is a horse with a two beat diagonal gait in which the left front and right hind foot touch the ground simultaneously and the right front and left hind do so also. He has a level top line and a relaxed appearance while being shown with light contact and appears to guide well. This is the standard or average jog.

5) Good Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.

6) Very Good Jog: Is a horse that appears very comfortable to ride, always has a consistent two beat gait, is guiding well, and has a relaxed and level top line. He may let his hocks drift back into his tail from time to time, or bends his knee a little, but is obviously soft on the ground.

7) Excellent Jog: This is a horse whose motions seem effortless and very efficient. He swings his legs, yet touches the ground very softly. The horse is confident, yet still soft in his motion. He is balanced and under control. He is flat with his knee and hock and has some cushion in his pastern. His expression is bright and alert and exhibits more lift and self-carriage than the "very good jog".

C) THE MODERATE EXTENDED JOG:

1) Good Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend has an obvious lengthening in his stride with a slight increase in his pace making him more versatile. This horse is still smooth but appears to have more length with less effort being exerted.

2) Average Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend, moves up in his pace and still appears smooth to sit on.

3) Poor Extended Jog: This horse never appears to lengthen his stride but just jogs faster. He may also appear to be jarring and rough to ride.

D) THE LOPE:

1) Unacceptable Lope: This is a horse that does not have a true three beat gait. He has no flow, no rhythm or balance, appears out of sync, and is obviously not comfortable to ride.

2) Poor Lope: Is a horse that may appear to have a three beat gait but has no lift or self-carriage. This horse shuffles, has no flow, and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. He also does not appear comfortable to ride.

3) Slightly Below Average Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of these negative characteristics may be head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse's buttocks. An over-canted horse generally displays these negative characteristics.

4) Correct or Average Lope: This is a horse that has a true three beat gait, with a level top line and very little head and neck motion. The horse has a comfortable motion and is relatively straight (not over-canted). He glides well, and has a relaxed appearance. This is the standard or average lope.

5) Good Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage, a steady top-line, responsiveness to the rider's aids and a relaxed appearance.

6) Very Good Lope: This is a horse that appears to have more lift and flow than the average horse. He also has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee a little, or allow his off lead hind leg or drive leg to fall behind into his tail, yet he still has a level top-line, exhibits self-carriage with a relaxed appearance and appears comfortable to ride.

7) Excellent Lope: This horse rounds his back and has a strong deep stride and a flat swing with his front legs. He swings his legs correct and long yet seems to do it effortlessly. He keeps a very level top-line; his hocks don't drift behind into his tail. This horse has a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance. This is a very special horse that is correct, yet soft. This horse has a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

E) THE TOP-LINE:

1) Poor Top-Line: The horse's head may be to high or to low. If the horse's head is consistently higher than his eye level with his withers, his back becomes hollow and he loses his drive from behind. When his head is consistently lower than his ear level with his wither, he becomes heavy on his forehand and has no lift or flow. In both cases the horse loses his self-carriage and appears to struggle.

2) Average Top-Line: A horse who generally display's a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point but is inconsistent with his head carriage.

3) Good Top-Line: This horse will display a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point. He also displays a consistent top-line that exhibits self-carriage.

F) THE BACK UP:

1) Poor Back Up: This horse appears resistant or heavy in front. He may gap his mouth, throw his head or back crooked.

2) Average or Correct Back Up: This horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

3) Good Back Up: This horse will display balanced and smooth flowing movements, self-carriage, and look to be a pleasure to ride. The horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly and without gapping his mouth. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

G) Horses must be sound of limb.


JUDGING

159. See also: Judges (#104 - 117), A General (#118) and Rules (#121 D & E)
A. This class will be judged on the performance of the horse over obstacles, with emphasis on manners, response to the rider, and quality of movement. Credit will be given to horses negotiating the obstacles with style and some degree of speed, providing correctness is not sacrificed. Horses should receive credit for showing attentiveness to the obstacles and the capability of picking their own way through the course when obstacles warrant it, and willingly responding to the rider's cues on more difficult obstacles.

B. Horse shall be penalized for any unnecessary delay while approaching or negotiating the obstacles. Horses with artificial appearance over obstacles should be penalized.

C. Horses must not be required to work on the rail. The course must be designed, however, to require each horse to show the three gaits (walk, jog, lope) somewhere between obstacles as a part of its work and quality of movement and cadence should be considered as part of the maneuver score. While on the line of travel between obstacles, the horse shall be balanced, carrying his head and neck in a relaxed, natural position, with the poll level with or slightly above the withers. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance. Gait between obstacles shall be at the discretion of the judge.

D. The course to be used must be posted at least one hour before scheduled starting time of the class.

E. Scoring will be on the basis of 0-infinity, with 70 denoting an average performance. Each obstacle will receive an obstacle score that should be added or subtracted from 70 and is subject to a penalty that should be subtracted. Each obstacle will be scored on the following basis, ranging from plus 1 1/2 to minus 1 1/2: -1 1/2 extremely poor, -1 very poor, -1/2 poor, 0 correct, 1/2 good, 1 very good, 1 1/2 excellent. Obstacle scores are to be determined and assessed independently of penalty points. Penalties should be assessed per occurrence as follows:

F. The following deductions will result:

0 - SCORE

Use of more than one finger between reins

Use of two hands (except in Snaffle Bit or Bosal classes designated for two hands) or changing hands on reins; except for junior horses shown with bosal or snaffle bit, only one hand may be used on the reins, except that it is permissible to change hands to work an obstacle.

Use of romal other than as outlined: Whenever this handbook refers to romal, it means an extension of braided material attached to closed reins. This extension shall be carried in the free hand with a 16-inch (40 cm) spacing between the reining hand and the free handholding the romal. When using romal reins, the riders hand shall be around the reins with the wrist kept straight and relaxed, the thumb on top and the fingers closed lightly around the reins. When using a romal, no fingers between the reins are allowed.

Performing the obstacles other than in specified order

No attempt to perform an obstacle

Equipment failure that delays completion of pattern

Excessively or repeatedly touching the horse on the neck to lower the head

Fall to the ground by horse or rider

Failure to enter, exit or work obstacle from correct side or direction, including overturns of more than 1/4 turn

Failure to follow the correct line of travel within or between obstacles

Failure to work an obstacle in any manner other than how it's described by the course

Riding outside designated boundary marker of the course

Third refusal

Failure to demonstrate correct lead or gait, if designated

1/2 POINT

Each tick of log, pole, cone or obstacle

1 POINT

Each hit of or stepping on a log, pole, cone or obstacle

Break of gait at walk or jog for two strides or less

Both front or hind feet in a single-strided slot or space

Skipping over or failing to step into required space

Split pole in lope-over

Failure to meet the correct strides on trot over and lope over log

obstacles

3 POINT

Break of gait at walk or jog for more than 2 strides

Out of lead or break of gait at lope (except when correcting an

incorrect lead)

Knocking down an elevated pole, cone, barrel, plant obstacle, or

severely disturbing an obstacle.

Stepping outside the confines of, falling or jumping off or out of an obstacle with one foot

5 POINT

Dropping slicker or object required to be carried on course

First refusal, balk, or attempting to evade an obstacle by shying or backing more than 2 strides away

Letting go of gate or dropping rope gate

Use of either hand to instill fear or praise

Stepping outside the confines of, falling or jumping off or out of an obstacle with more than one foot

Blatant disobedience (kicking out, bucking, rearing, striking)

Second refusal, balk, or attempting to evade an obstacle by shying or backing more than two strides away

Failure to complete obstacle

Faults, which occur on the line of travel between obstacles, scored according to severity:

1. head carried too high

2. head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers)

3. over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical

4. excessive nosing out

5. opening mouth excessively

G. Management, when setting courses, should keep in mind that the idea is not to trap a horse, or eliminate it by making an obstacle too difficult. All courses and obstacles are to be constructed with safety in mind so as to eliminate any accidents. If difficult courses are set, junior trail should be less difficult. When the distances and spaces are measured between all obstacles, the inside base to inside base measurement of each obstacle considering the normal path of the horse, should be the measuring point. Enough space must be provided for a horse to jog [at least 30 feet (9 meters)] and lope [at least 50 feet (15 meters)] for the judges to evaluate these gaits.

H. If disrupted, the course shall be reset after each horse has worked. In the case that a combination of obstacles are used, the course cannot be reset until the contestant finishes the entire course regardless of where any disruption occurs.

I. At least six obstacles must be used, three of which must be from the mandatory list of obstacles and at least three different others selected from the list of optional obstacles.

J. Mandatory obstacles:

1. Opening, passing through, and closing gate. (Losing control of gate is to be penalized.) Use a gate which will not endanger horse or rider. If the gate has a metal, plastic or wooden support bar under the opening, contestants must work the gate moving forward through it.

2. Ride over at least four logs or poles. These can be in a straight line, curved, zigzag or raised. The space between the logs is to be measured and the path the horse is to take should be the measuring point. Trotovers and lopeovers cannot be elevated in novice classes. All elevated elements must be placed in a cup, notched block, or otherwise secured so they cannot roll. The height should be measured from the ground to the top of the element. Spacing for walkovers, trotovers, and lopeovers should be as follows or increments thereof.

a. The spacing for walkovers shall be 20" to 24" (40 cm to 60 cm) and may be elevated to 12" (30 cm). Elevated walkovers should be set at least 22" (55 cm) apart.

b. The spacing for trotovers shall be 3' to 3'6" (90cm-105cm) and may be elevated to 8" (20 cm).

c. The spacing for lopeovers shall be 6' to 7' (1.8 to 2.1 meters) or increments thereof, and may be elevated to 8" (20 cm). (3) Backing obstacle. Backing obstacles to be spaced a minimum of 28" (70 cm). If elevated, 30" (75 cm) spacing is required. Entrants cannot be asked to back over a stationary object such as a wooden pole or metal bar.

3. Back through and around at least three markers.

4. Back through L, V, U, straight, or similar shaped course. May be elevated no more than 24" (60 cm).

K. Optional obstacles, but not limited to:

1. Water hazard (ditch or small pond). No metal or slick bottom-boxes will be used.

2. Serpentine obstacles at walk or jog. Spacing to be minimum of 6' ( 1.8 meters) for jog.

3. Carry object from one part of arena to another. (Only objects which reasonably might be carried on a trail ride may be used.)

4. Ride over wooden bridge. (Suggested minimum width shall be 36" (90 cm) wide and at least six feet long). Bridge should be sturdy, safe and negotiated at a walk only.

5. Put on and remove slicker.

6. Remove and replace materials from mailbox.

7. Side pass [may be elevated to 12" (30 cm) maximum].

8 An obstacle consisting of four logs or rails, each 5' to 7' (1.5 to 2.1 meters) long, laid in a square. Each contestant will enter the 185 square by riding over log or rail as designated. When all four feet are inside the square, rider should execute a turn, as indicated, and depart.

9. Any other safe and negotiable obstacle which could reasonably be expected to be encountered on a trail ride and meets the approval of the judge may be used.

10. A combination of two or more of any obstacle is acceptable.

L. Unacceptable obstacles:

1. Tires

2. Animals

3. Hides

4. PVC pipe

5. Dismounting

6. Jumps

7. Rocking or moving bridges

8. Water box with floating or moving parts

9. Flames, dry ice, fire extinguisher, etc.

10. Logs or poles elevated in a manner that permits such to roll.

11. Ground ties

M. The judge must walk the course and has the right and duty to alter the course in any manner. The judge may remove or change any obstacle he deems unsafe or non-negotiable. If at any time a trail obstacle is deemed to be unsafe by the judge, it shall be repaired or removed from the course. If it cannot be repaired and horses have completed the course, the score for that obstacle shall be deducted from all previous works for that class.


WESTERN RIDING
EQUIPMENT


160. Horses may be ridden with one hand and a standard western bit as approved by NSBA or with two hands and a snaflle bit or bosal as described under NSBA equipment rules.

ATTIRE

161. Conventional western attire is mandatory. Conventional attire includes long sleeve shirt with collar (band, stand-up, tuxedo, etc.) western hat and cowboy boots. The hat must be on the riders head when exhibitor enters the show arena. Spurs and chaps are optional.

GAITS

162. Western riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, flying lead changes at the lope, response to the rider, manners, and disposition. The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving.
The following terminology shall apply whenever a specific gait is called for:

A) THE WALK:

1) Poor Walk: Is a horse with an uneven pace and no cadence. He has a robot appearance and hesitates. He has no flow, and he may appear intimidated, or appear to march.

2) Average Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, a level top line, and appears relaxed. This done correctly is average.

3) Good Walk: Is a horse with a four beat gait, level top line, and a relaxed appearance yet is bright and attentive; he flows and is soft touching the ground.

B) THE JOG

1) Unacceptable Jog: This is a horse that cannot perform a two beat gait and appears very uncomfortable in his attempt to accomplish the gait. He does not have any flow or balance in his motion and appears uncomfortable to ride.

2) Poor Jog: This is a horse that hesitates or skips a beat in his two beat motion. He does not keep an even and balanced motion with a level top line. A horse must have a true two beat gait to be average. This horse appears to shuffle.

3) Slightly Below Average Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of the negative characteristics may be walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes as he jogs or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.

4) Correct or Average Jog: This is a horse with a two beat diagonal gait in which the left front and right hind foot touch the ground simultaneously and the right front and left hind do so also. He has a level top line and a relaxed appearance while being shown with light contact and appears to guide well. This is the standard or average jog.

5) Good Jog: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.

6) Very Good Jog: Is a horse that appears very comfortable to ride, always has a consistent two beat gait, is guiding well, and has a relaxed and level top line. He may let his hocks drift back into his tail from time to time, or bends his knee a little, but is obviously soft on the ground.

7) Excellent Jog: This is a horse whose motions seem effortless and very efficient. He swings his legs, yet touches the ground very softly. The horse is confident, yet still soft in his motion. He is balanced and under control. He is flat with his knee and hock and has some cushion in his pastern. His expression is bright and alert and exhibits more lift and self-carriage than the "very good jog".

C) THE MODERATE EXTENDED JOG:

1) Good Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend has an obvious lengthening in his stride with a slight increase in his pace making him more versatile. This horse is still smooth but appears to have more length with less effort being exerted.

2) Average Extended Jog: Is a horse who when asked to extend, moves up in his pace and still appears smooth to sit on.

3) Poor Extended Jog: This horse never appears to lengthen his stride but just jogs faster. He may also appear to be jarring and rough to ride.

D) THE LOPE:

1) Unacceptable Lope: This is a horse that does not have a true three beat gait. He has no flow, no rhythm or balance, appears out of sync, and is obviously not comfortable to ride.

2) Poor Lope: Is a horse that may appear to have a three beat gait but has no lift or self-carriage. This horse shuffles, has no flow, and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. He also does not appear comfortable to ride.

3) Slightly Below Average Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics in his performance. Some of these negative characteristics may be head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse's buttocks. An over-canted horse generally displays these negative characteristics.

4) Correct or Average Lope: This is a horse that has a true three beat gait, with a level top line and very little head and neck motion. The horse has a comfortable motion and is relatively straight (not over-canted). He glides well, and has a relaxed appearance. This is the standard or average lope.

5) Good Lope: Is a horse with an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance. Some of these positive characteristics may be balance and self-carriage, a steady top-line, responsiveness to the rider's aids and a relaxed appearance.

6) Very Good Lope: This is a horse that appears to have more lift and flow than the average horse. He also has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee a little, or allow his off lead hind leg or drive leg to fall behind into his tail, yet he still has a level top-line, exhibits self-carriage with a relaxed appearance and appears comfortable to ride.

7) Excellent Lope: This horse rounds his back and has a strong deep stride and a flat swing with his front legs. He swings his legs correct and long yet seems to do it effortlessly. He keeps a very level top-line; his hocks don't drift behind into his tail. This horse has a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance. This is a very special horse that is correct, yet soft. This horse has a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

E) THE TOP-LINE:

1) Poor Top-Line: The horse's head may be to high or to low. If the horse's head is consistently higher than his eye level with his withers, his back becomes hollow and he loses his drive from behind. When his head is consistently lower than his ear level with his wither, he becomes heavy on his forehand and has no lift or flow. In both cases the horse loses his self-carriage and appears to struggle.

2) Average Top-Line: A horse who generally display's a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point but is inconsistent with his head carriage.

3) Good Top-Line: This horse will display a level top-line with the tip of the ear level with the wither at the lowest point or his eye level with the wither at the highest point. He also displays a consistent top-line that exhibits self-carriage.

F) THE BACK UP:

1) Poor Back Up: This horse appears resistant or heavy in front. He may gap his mouth, throw his head or back crooked.

2) Average or Correct Back Up: This horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

3) Good Back Up: This horse will display balanced and smooth flowing movements, self-carriage, and look to be a pleasure to ride. The horse should back straight at least one horse length quietly and without gapping his mouth. This should be done smoothly with light contact and without hesitation.

G) Horses must be sound of limb.


JUDGING

163. See also: Judges (#104 - 117), A General (#118) and Rules (#121 D & E)
A. Credit will be given for, and emphasis placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits (i.e., starting and finishing pattern with the sane cadence), and the horse's ability to change leads precisely, easily and simultaneously both hind and front at the center point between the markers. The horse should have a relaxed head carriage showing response to the rider's hands, with a moderate flexion at the poll. Horses may be ridden with light contact or on a reasonably loose rein. The horse should cross the log both at the jog and the lope without breaking gait or radically changing stride.

B. The judge will select one of the four patterns to be performed. The judge is responsible for the patterns being correctly set.

C. On the pattern:

1.The eight small circles represent pylon markers, which are recommended. These should be separated by a uniform measured distance of not less than 30 feet (9meters) and not more than 50 feet (15 meters) on the sides with 5 markers (see diagram). In pattern one, the three markers on the opposite side should be set adjacent to the appropriate markers. It is recommended that the markers be set a minimum of 15 feet (4 1/2 meters) from the fence and with 50 to 80 foot (15 to 24 meters) width in the pattern, as the arena permits.

2. A solid log or pole should be used and be a minimum of 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length.

3. The long serpentine line represents the direction of travel and gaits at which the horse is to move. The shaded area represents the recommended lead changing area between the markers. The dotted line (…) indicates walk, the dash line (---) jog, and the solid line (___) lope.

D. Scoring will be on a basis of 0 - 100 with 70 denoting an average performance.

1. Scoring guide lines to be considered: points will be added and subtracted from the maneuvers on the following basis, ranging from plus 1.5 to minus 1.5: -1.5 extremely poor, =1 very poor, -.5 poor, 0 average, .5 good, 1 very good, 1.5 excellent.

2. Maneuver scores are to be determined independently of penalty points.

E. A contestant shall be penalized each time the following occur:

1. Five points

a. Out of lead beyond the next designated change area (note: failures to change, including cross-cantering. Two consecutive failures to change would result in two five (5) point penalties).

b. Blatant disobedience including kicking out, biting, bucking, and rearing

2. Three points

a. Not performing the specific gait or not stopping when called for in the pattern, within 10 feet (3 meters) of the designated area

b. Simple change of leads

c. Out of lead at or before the marker prior to the designated change area or out of lead at or after the marker after the designated change area

d. Additional lead changes anywhere in the pattern (except when correcting an extra lead change or incorrect lead)

e. In pattern one & three failure to start the lope within 30 feet (90 meters) after crossing the log at the jog

f. Break of gait at walk or jog for more than two strides

g. Break of gait at the lope

3. One point

a. Hitting or rolling the log

b. Out of lead more than one stride either side of the center point and between the markers

c. Splitting the log (log between the two front or two hind feet) at the lope

d. Break of gait at the walk or jog up to two strides

4. One-half (1/2) point

a. Tick or light touch of the log

b. Hind legs skipping or coming together during lead change

c. Non-simultaneous lead change (front to hind or hind to front)

5. Disqualified - 0 score

a. Fall to ground by horse and rider

b. Illegal equipment

c. Willful abuse

d. Off course

e. Knocking over markers

f. Completely missing log

g. Major refusal - stop and back more than 2 strides or 4 steps with the front legs

h. Major disobedience or schooling

i. Failure to start lope prior to end cone in patterns #1 and #3

j. Four or more simple lead changes or failures to change leads

k. Overturns of more than ¼ turn

F. Credits

1. Changes of leads, hind and front simultaneously

2. Changes at designated point

3. Accurate and smooth pattern

4. Even pace throughout

5. Easy to guide and control with rein and leg

6. Manners and disposition

7. Conformation and fitness

G. The following characteristics are considered faults and should be judged accordingly in the maneuver scores:

1. Opening mouth excessively

2. Anticipating signals or early lead changes

3. Stumbling


Lexikon einblenden



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Quelle: DQHA - vom 03.01.2006

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